neurosciencestuff:

A 12-year-old schoolgirl has been accepted into Mensa after discovering she is brainier than both Albert Einstein and Stephen Hawking.
Olivia Manning, from Liverpool, managed to get a whopping score in an IQ test of 162 - well above the 100 average.
Her score is not only two points better than genius German physicist Einstein and Professor Stephen Hawking, but puts her in the top one per cent of intelligent people in the world.
(Other sources: Liverpool Daily Post)

neurosciencestuff:

A 12-year-old schoolgirl has been accepted into Mensa after discovering she is brainier than both Albert Einstein and Stephen Hawking.

Olivia Manning, from Liverpool, managed to get a whopping score in an IQ test of 162 - well above the 100 average.

Her score is not only two points better than genius German physicist Einstein and Professor Stephen Hawking, but puts her in the top one per cent of intelligent people in the world.

(Other sources: Liverpool Daily Post)

upworthy:

Screw The Hollywood Definition Of Beauty — We’re Changing That One Selfie At A Time

#nofilter #AdsWeLike

Julie Zeilinger, 19, Authors Book Claiming ‘Feminism’ is not a Dirty Word

“So. I’m a teenager and I wrote a book. And not just any book. A book about feminism. What kind of obviously pretentious and generally ridiculous teen does that?”

This excerpt comes directly from the first page of Julie Zeilinger’s book, A Little F’d Up: Why Feminism is Not a Dirty Word.  From girls’ anxiety over body image to sex trafficking and female genital mutilation, the book details issue after issue that women face in the world today.  With women constantly up against double standards, rampant sexism, and outright abuse, Zeilinger argues that feminism is the solution.

Read more and listen to an interview with Julie on our website!

[DISPATCHES] This Month, Students Massed Against Stop-and-Frisk, Won on Title IX and Scared Off Tom Corbett

youngist:

by StudentNation | The Nation

image

Philadelphia students greet Governor Corbett. — Photo via PCAPS

[This post, edited by Youngist's James Cersonsky (@cersonsky), first appeared on The Nation, and has been republished here with permission. ]

Last spring, The Nation launched its biweekly student movement dispatch. As part of the StudentNation blog, each dispatch hosts ten first-person updates on student and youth organizing in the United States—from established student unions to emerging national networks, to ad hoc campaigns that don’t yet have a name. For an archive of earlier editions, check out the New Year’s dispatch.

1. As Strike Waters Heat Up, Portland Students Walk Out

In early January, the Portland Student Union held three days of action in support of the Portland Association of Teachers in its current contract negotiations. Jefferson and Wilson High School students walked out, while Cleveland High School student union members held three days of speakouts. Overall, more than 300 students participated in the days of action. On January 13, the demonstrations culminated in a school board rallywith 500 students, parents and workers. At the board meeting, the PDXSU presented “The Schools Portland Students Demand,” a set of priorities that students see as vital to their education.

—Portland Student Union

2. After Months of Student Pressure, Obama Acts on Title IX

Ed Act Now, the movement for better federal enforcement of Title IX, was thrilled by President Obama’s January 22 announcement of a new task force to combat campus sexual violence. After garnering public support through a protest and online petition, student organizers met with White House officials in July to discuss their ideas. Ed Act Now is encouraged to see many of its proposals—including stricter enforcement of existing laws and greater federal transparency—included in a public memo outlining the task force’s plans. Activists are now working to ensure that the task force calls on a diversity of survivor voices—crossing lines of race, ethnicity, gender, sexual orientation, immigration status, type of educational institution and form of violence suffered—to inform the White House’s investigations.

—Ed Act Now

Read More

(via youngist)

"We must always change, renew, rejuvenate ourselves; otherwise we harden."

Goethe (via londonflaneur)

What have you done to replenish your creativity this year? 

(via projectedblog)

(via projectedblog)

nietzschesghost:

kawaii-kekki:

minn2x:

As a black person this makes me really proud but at the same time it really frustrates me because the news never focus on the positive qualities of blacks which in reality actually out weighs the negatives but the media only focus on the negatives.. why does a 4 year old black boy cussing makes huge media headlines but a 4 year black girl genius does not……that’s what really frustrates me. 

signal boosting because no matter what that stuff is really impressive and deserves to be recognized! like dang, you go!!

And yet the youngest lady to pass the bar was covered…at least on british news outlets…not sure why other countries would cover it though.

(via politicallyimbalancedbullshit)

submit-startup:

taking chances that’s what being entrepreneur is all about!

submit-startup:

taking chances that’s what being entrepreneur is all about!

frenchchairs:

It is an unusual school in an unusual location and is run by an unusual teacher.

Rajesh Kumar is a shopkeeper by profession but spends hours every morning teaching around 80 children from the poorest of the poor in India’s capital.

The 43-year-old visited the construction of the Delhi transit station a few years ago and was disturbed by the sight of  many children playing at the site instead of attending school.

When he questioned the parents working at the sites they all said there were no schools in the vicinity and no one cared.

Consequently, his open-air class room was born - between pillars and beneath the tracks of the Delhi transit system, known as the Metro.

Every few minutes a train passes above, the children unperturbed by its sounds.

There are no chairs or tables and the children sit on rolls of polystyrene foam placed on the rubble.

Three rectangular patches of wall are painted black and used as a blackboard.

Anonymous donors have contributed cardigans, books, shoes and stationery for the children, as their parents cannot afford them.

One unnamed individual sends a bag full of biscuits and fruit juice for the pupils every day - another incentive for the children to turn up for their studies.

(via all-about-human-rights)

edukaition:

Reading a book for a class that all first year teachers in my corporation are required to take. The author just called technology “faddish and time-gobbling.”
I work in a 1:1 corporation. All I could think of is this chart, so naturally I uploaded this picture to our required discussion board.

edukaition:

Reading a book for a class that all first year teachers in my corporation are required to take. The author just called technology “faddish and time-gobbling.”

I work in a 1:1 corporation. All I could think of is this chart, so naturally I uploaded this picture to our required discussion board.

(Source: twitter.com, via plaidteachings)

Emmanuel Bishop: the teenager violonist with Down syndrome

Emmanuel Bishop is a 16-year-old boy with Down syndrome, who plays the violin and speaks English, Spanish, French and Latin. He is an ambitious young man, who lets nothing stand in the way of his dreams. Down syndrome occurs when an individuals has ‘a full or partial extra copy of chromosome 21.

Read more about Emmanuel on our website.

(Source: britnerhus)

tedx:

High school senior Piper Otterbein has dyslexia, but it doesn’t define her. In a talk at TEDxYouth@CEHS, she shares the lesson that her difficulties with dyslexia have taught her — the best path in life is to harness the strengths you already have, rather than fixate on things you think you lack.

Watch the whole talk here»

stories-yet-to-be-written:

yagazieemeziAFRICA YOGA PROJECT:

Africa Yoga Project is a grassroots 501c3 Not-For-Profit Organization that has introduced thousands of students in Kenya to the practice of yoga, as well provides educational scholarships, job training, food stipends, temporary housing and health services.

The poject offers financial support to 38 teachers in exchange for teaching yoga in the communities of Nairobi providing a healthy, motivational venue for young adults to engage with their community, build support systems and change lives. 

WEBSITE

(via myvoicemyright)

lazysmirk:


Lale Labuko witnessed the unspeakable and spoke out. At age 15, he saw elders from his tribe in southwestern Ethiopia tear a two-year-old girl from her mother’s arms and run away with her. The child was never seen again. 
On that day, he heard the word mingi for the first time—a term to describe a cursed baby or child. Ancient belief says children who are deemed mingi will bring drought, famine, and disease to the tribe if they are allowed to live. Ritualistic killing is traditionally seen as the only solution.
 “I was crying and so shocked. I wanted to save that little girl.” 
The killings are kept secret from anyone younger than 15. In fact, Labuko later learned he had two older sisters, both mingi, who were killed before he ever knew them.
When did you find out about this practice?
I was around 15. A village elder grabbed a two-year-old from the mother, and the mother was crying. I was not sure what was going on. My mother said, “Lale, some children in the tribe are declared mingi,and they kill them.” She said mingi means “cursed.”
How are the children killed?
Sometimes they’re left in the bush, no water, no nothing. Or they’re pushed off a cliff.
When did you first try to take action?
In 2008 I said to the elders, you think these children are cursed and bring disease and famine. Could you give me a child? Maybe the curse will follow me. Some elders agreed: “Let’s try and see.”
How big a risk was this?
Others warned me: “You rescue the children, one day [the tribe is] going to kill you.”
Clearly you didn’t listen.
Yes. And my tribe [the Kara] has stopped [the practice] completely. But the Hamer tribe still practices it. It’s hard to change an ancient culture.
Do you tell the children you’ve rescued about the fate they escaped?
They are too young. I tell them, “You are here for school.” When they are older, I will explain, “This is a custom. It’s not your parents’ fault. It was good I rescued you guys.” This year I got an email from National Geographic recognizing me as an “emerging explorer.” These children, one day, they will be the next emerging explorers. X

For more info, including where to donate, see XX

lazysmirk:

Lale Labuko witnessed the unspeakable and spoke out. At age 15, he saw elders from his tribe in southwestern Ethiopia tear a two-year-old girl from her mother’s arms and run away with her. The child was never seen again.

On that day, he heard the word mingi for the first time—a term to describe a cursed baby or child. Ancient belief says children who are deemed mingi will bring drought, famine, and disease to the tribe if they are allowed to live. Ritualistic killing is traditionally seen as the only solution.

“I was crying and so shocked. I wanted to save that little girl.”

The killings are kept secret from anyone younger than 15. In fact, Labuko later learned he had two older sisters, both mingi, who were killed before he ever knew them.

When did you find out about this practice?

I was around 15. A village elder grabbed a two-year-old from the mother, and the mother was crying. I was not sure what was going on. My mother said, “Lale, some children in the tribe are declared mingi,and they kill them.” She said mingi means “cursed.”

How are the children killed?

Sometimes they’re left in the bush, no water, no nothing. Or they’re pushed off a cliff.

When did you first try to take action?

In 2008 I said to the elders, you think these children are cursed and bring disease and famine. Could you give me a child? Maybe the curse will follow me. Some elders agreed: “Let’s try and see.”

How big a risk was this?

Others warned me: “You rescue the children, one day [the tribe is] going to kill you.”

Clearly you didn’t listen.

Yes. And my tribe [the Kara] has stopped [the practice] completely. But the Hamer tribe still practices it. It’s hard to change an ancient culture.

Do you tell the children you’ve rescued about the fate they escaped?

They are too young. I tell them, “You are here for school.” When they are older, I will explain, “This is a custom. It’s not your parents’ fault. It was good I rescued you guys.” This year I got an email from National Geographic recognizing me as an “emerging explorer.” These children, one day, they will be the next emerging explorers. X

For more info, including where to donate, see XX

(via lgbtq-rainbow)